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From the Admin Desk: LTD joins The Great Standards Debate

October 19th, 2011 | by mm | No Comments

AT THE LTD ANNUAL MEETING (Saturday, October 29th, from 11:30am-12:30pm (LT8)):

Standards have become a hot topic for practitioners, LSPs, professional
associations, academics and technology providers. Each has a stake in
shaping the outcome. What should ATA do? What should YOU do? Read
the article “The Year of Standards” by Michael Metzger, outgoing LTD
administrator to understand the debate better. The article can be found
on the LTD website at http://tinyurl.com/3rjw64k

Panel Discussion “The Great Standards Debate” @ LTD Annual Meeting

After reading the article “The Year of Standards” on the LTD website at http://tinyurl.com/3rjw64k and Alan Melby’s on Data Standards in the October issue of The ATA Chronicle join us for a brief excursion into the activities and initiatives in Data, Process and Metrics standards with our invited Panelists Beatriz Bonnet, Susanne Lauscher and Alan Melby and Moderator Jiri Stejskal.

Mark your calendar for the Panel discussion “The Great Standards Debate”
at the Annual Meeting at the ATA Conference in Boston
on Saturday, October 29th, from 11:30am-12:30pm (LT8).

Conference Sessions by Specialty
http://www.atanet.org/conf/2011/byspecial.php

See you all there!

From the Admin Desk: Attend the LTD Annual Meeting during the ATA 52nd Annual Conference

October 18th, 2011 | by mm | No Comments

LTD Annual Meeting 2011

Current LTD Leadership is handing off the baton. Come and find out more about our incoming Leadership, the Leadership Council and the plans our new team has for the coming years!

Mark your calendar for the Annual Meeting
at the ATA Conference in Boston on
Saturday, October 29th, from 11:30am-12:30pm (LT8).

Annual Conference Home Page
http://www.atanet.org/conf/2011

Conference Sessions by Specialty
http://www.atanet.org/conf/2011/byspecial.php

See you all there!

INTERNATIONAL LINGUISTIC ASSOCIATION LECTURE SERIES

October 18th, 2011 | by LTD | No Comments

http://www.ilaword.org/Meetings.htm

FIRST FALL PRESENTATION IN 2011

The First 2011 Fall semester presentation will be on Saturday, Oct 22, 2011 at 11 am at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Conference Room, Department of English (7th Floor) 619 West 54th Street (between 11th and 12th Avenues) New York, NY 10019

Miguel A. Jiménez-Crespo, Rutgers University
The “Language of Translation” in an Internet Era

For over three decades, Translation Scholars have researched the specific features of the “language of translation”, mostly since the emergence of Descriptive Corpus-Based Translation Studies (Baker 1993). The differentiated nature of translated language has led several scholars to coin terms for this feature such as “third code” (wley, 1984), or “hybrid language” (Trosborg 2000). This variety of language is considered to have specific linguistic, pragmatic and discursive features that deserved to be studied in its own right (Baker 1995). The emergence of the Internet has meant that users interact daily with web texts translated from English into other languages. That is the case of Google, Facebook, Twitter or most online email services. Are we fully aware of how often we interact with translated digital texts? Do we realize that these texts are inherently different from spontaneously produced texts? Users not only interact with this new hybrid language, but they contribute to its creation through volunteer translation communities in the WWW. This is referred to as “crowdsourced translation”, in which websites or media content are translated collaboratively by many non-professional translators.

This presentation reviews the current state of research into the “language of translation”, and projects it towards the future in the light of the Internet revolution. Issues such as the impact of universals of translation, translation memories, machine translation and non-professional crowdsourcing models will be explored as they contribute in unpredictable ways to language change. The presentation will end with a case study that shows that the Facebook translation crowdsourcing model can lead to texts that better match the expectations of target linguistic communities.