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INTERNATIONAL LINGUISTIC ASSOCIATION LECTURE SERIES

October 18th, 2011 | by LTD | No Comments

http://www.ilaword.org/Meetings.htm

FIRST FALL PRESENTATION IN 2011

The First 2011 Fall semester presentation will be on Saturday, Oct 22, 2011 at 11 am at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Conference Room, Department of English (7th Floor) 619 West 54th Street (between 11th and 12th Avenues) New York, NY 10019

Miguel A. Jiménez-Crespo, Rutgers University
The “Language of Translation” in an Internet Era

For over three decades, Translation Scholars have researched the specific features of the “language of translation”, mostly since the emergence of Descriptive Corpus-Based Translation Studies (Baker 1993). The differentiated nature of translated language has led several scholars to coin terms for this feature such as “third code” (wley, 1984), or “hybrid language” (Trosborg 2000). This variety of language is considered to have specific linguistic, pragmatic and discursive features that deserved to be studied in its own right (Baker 1995). The emergence of the Internet has meant that users interact daily with web texts translated from English into other languages. That is the case of Google, Facebook, Twitter or most online email services. Are we fully aware of how often we interact with translated digital texts? Do we realize that these texts are inherently different from spontaneously produced texts? Users not only interact with this new hybrid language, but they contribute to its creation through volunteer translation communities in the WWW. This is referred to as “crowdsourced translation”, in which websites or media content are translated collaboratively by many non-professional translators.

This presentation reviews the current state of research into the “language of translation”, and projects it towards the future in the light of the Internet revolution. Issues such as the impact of universals of translation, translation memories, machine translation and non-professional crowdsourcing models will be explored as they contribute in unpredictable ways to language change. The presentation will end with a case study that shows that the Facebook translation crowdsourcing model can lead to texts that better match the expectations of target linguistic communities.

How social can we be?

November 26th, 2009 | by mm | No Comments

We are currently discussing the use of our several media outlets, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, LTD News blog, the LTD newsletter and the LTD mailing list. Given we have only so much time a day we need to streamline our activities and ask members to participate in our monitored and maintained services unless we see momentum to keep other outlets open. So our current thinking is to keep posting here in the LTD News blog, the Yahoo group mailing list and on Twitter. For the time being we will use Facebook and LinkedIn locations only as the group’s Virtual Business Cards. Expect updates in both locations soon.

Crowd, Cloud and Machine Translation

November 7th, 2009 | by mm | 3 Comments

Our Annual General Meeting was definitely a “not to be missed event” at the ATA Conference in NY thanks to the enlightening and insightful presentations and answers of our panel, Rosana Wolochwianski, Naomi Baer and Beatriz Bonnet moderated through key questions by Laurie Gerber. One can really say that myth, hype and distortion were lifted in this session and gave attendees some perspective where the trends are going. Another voice echoing our findings at the conference can be heard (and read) here.  Insightful perspective on Translation Crowdsourcing from Jost Zetsche. If the link does not work for you, you will find the article published in the next ATA Chronicle or in Jost’s biweekly newsletter.

Update on the AGM this Friday

October 29th, 2009 | by MiW | No Comments

The Annual General Meeting of the Language Technology Division will take place this Friday from 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm in the Wilder session room on the 4th floor of the conference hotel.

The plan is to have 15 minutes devoted to Division business, and to spend the remainder of the time on some of the subjects that have been generating a lot of discussions in recent weeks and months. We will have a panel of experts to speak to different areas, and Laurie Gerber has agreed to the overall moderation.

In particular, we hope that

Please mark this time slot on your schedule and come to this meeting. These are important subjects that will have implications for the translation profession – probably sooner rather than later.